Home » Predicting the use of online video advertising: Using the theory of planned behavior. by Joonghwa Lee
Predicting the use of online video advertising: Using the theory of planned behavior. Joonghwa Lee

Predicting the use of online video advertising: Using the theory of planned behavior.

Joonghwa Lee

Published
ISBN : 9780549827900
NOOKstudy eTextbook
76 pages
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This study investigated factors influencing consumers intention to watch online video ads, as well as actual watching behavior, using the theory of planned behavior (TPB). All components including belief structures (behavioral, normative, andMoreThis study investigated factors influencing consumers intention to watch online video ads, as well as actual watching behavior, using the theory of planned behavior (TPB). All components including belief structures (behavioral, normative, and control beliefs), determinants of intention, intention, and actual behavior were examined. For more in-depth analysis, behavioral beliefs were decomposed into five distinct expected outcomes and crossover effects (which signify a significant relationship) were added between beliefs and determinants, and between different determinants. A positive relationship was found between intention and actual behavior. All determinants of intention (attitude toward watching online video ads, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control) positively influenced intention. Perceived behavioral control was negatively related to behavior. Crossover effects were added to connect both subjective norm and perceived behavioral control to attitude. Within behavioral beliefs, three expected outcomes (information, relaxation, and escapism-pass time) showed a positive influence on attitude. Another expected outcome, social interaction, was found to positively influence subjective norm. Entertainment, the final expected outcome, showed a positive relationship with all three determinants. Normative beliefs and control beliefs had a positive influence on subjective norm and perceived behavioral control, respectively. Implications of these findings for researchers and advertisers are further discussed.